Weekly Readings

http://www.jtsstrength.com/articles/2015/08/19/how-to-monitor-your-recovery/ -Proper recovery is often overlooked when it comes to developing and following a training program. You can’t train hard day in and day out if you haven’t recovered from the stress of the previous session. This article talks about some of the simple ways to monitor your own recovery so that you can get the most out of your training.

 

 

http://www.catalystathletics.com/article/1942/Lousy-Training-Right-Before-Weightlifting-Competition/ -This is a great article that talks about lousy periods of training leading up to a meet, and why you will still be ok on the platform. If you’re coming up on a meet soon and unhappy with your current training, make sure to give this one a read.

 

https://www.t-nation.com/training/shoulder-savers-3 -This is the last part of a 3 part series on how to keep your shoulders healthy by Eric Cressey. Cressey is one of the leaders in the strength and conditioning field when it comes to properly implementing corrective exercise, and this stands especially true when talking about the shoulder joint. If you have issues with your shoulders, make sure not to miss this one.

 

http://www.teammdusa.com/coach-pendlays-blog/build-it-yourself -This is a short one, but the message is very important. Glenn Pendlay talks about how although some people can train for weightlifting by just focusing on the clean and jerk and snatch with very little assistance, most won’t find success with this method. The majority of us are not genetically built for weightlifting. We have limbs that are too long, torsos that are too short, and other anthropometric features that are not in our favor. Our way of tipping the scales back in our direction is assistance work, and usually lots of it.